Foreign Ministry reaffirmed the sovereign rights over the Malvinas Islands and archipelagos of the South Atlantic

The Argentine Foreign Ministry reaffirmed the sovereign claim over the Malvinas Islands on a new anniversary of the Day of the Affirmation of Argentine Rights over the Malvinas, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and the corresponding maritime spaces.

11 de June de 2024 10:59

"We reaffirm once again our rights of sovereignty over the Malvinas Islands, South Georgia Islands, the South Sandwich Islands, and the surrounding maritime spaces, as all of them are an integral part of our national territory," says the Foreign Ministry.

In the statement released this June 10 within the framework of the Day of the Affirmation of Argentine Rights over the Malvinas, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands , the historic declaration of sovereignty of the South Atlantic islands from the first experiences is highlighted. independence in 1810 , the Nation being heir to the titles of Spain .

Then the Argentine Government of the Islands was installed in 1929 , with the Political and Military Command carried out by Luis Vernet . Later, the invasion of British pirates occurred on January 3, 1833 , expelling the population and legitimate Argentine authorities.

“Since then, there has been a sovereignty dispute between the Argentine Republic and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, as recognized by the United Nations General Assembly through resolution 2065 (XX) adopted in 1965,” he states. the statement from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and Worship , by Diana Mondino .

On the other hand, the Foreign Ministry emphasizes the mandate of the United Nations that Argentina and the United Kingdom must find a peaceful and negotiated solution to "put an end to the special and particular colonial situation in the question of the Malvinas Islands."

“In compliance with the aforementioned resolution, since 1966 and for 16 years, both countries carried out negotiations to reach a solution to the sovereignty dispute,” the statement said, adding that “despite Argentina's innumerable invitations and exhortations of the United Nations, the United Kingdom systematically refuses to resume sovereignty negotiations.”

“On November 4, 1982, the United Nations General Assembly adopted by a large majority Resolution 37/9 a few months after the end of the South Atlantic conflict, which determined that the war did not modify the nature of the dispute. of sovereignty nor did it resolve it,” says the text released by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and Worship.

"The international community has reiterated the need to resume bilateral negotiations as soon as possible, which was expressed in 10 resolutions of the General Assembly and in numerous resolutions of the United Nations Special Committee on Decolonization - the statement says -, as well as in various declarations of regional and multilateral forums, such as the Organization of American States, the Group of 77 and China, the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Ibero-American Summits, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), among other".

“The Argentine Government reiterates its willingness to resume sovereignty negotiations with the United Kingdom, while proposing to advance a common agenda in areas and issues of mutual interest,” indicates the official note, adding that “the Government "Argentina wishes to maintain a mature relationship with the United Kingdom, which contemplates a substantive and constructive dialogue on all issues of common interest with a view to generating a climate of trust conducive to the resumption of negotiations."

"On this date always important for all Argentines, we reaffirm once again our rights of sovereignty over the Malvinas Islands, South Georgia Islands, South Sandwich Islands, and the surrounding maritime spaces, as all of them are an integral part of our national territory," it concludes.

 

By Agenda Malvinas

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